RIETI Report February 2003

University Evaluations: What will Become of Japanese Universities?
<RIETI Featured Fellow> HARAYAMA Yuko

<Ref. >Evolution of University Evaluation System in Japan

1991Universities become obliged to self-monitor and self-evaluate their own research and educational activities in line with a proposal by the University Council. According to this line of thought, many universities have publicized evaluation results and some began to publish a "university white paper."
1996JUAA introduces a "reaccreditation" system. The evaluation under this system, however, is optional and there is no obligation to announce the results.
1998The University Council, in its university reform proposals, calls for reinforcing the existing self-monitoring and self-evaluation systems and points to the need to introduce objective third-party evaluations, thus, calling for the establishment of a third party organ to carry out that task.
1999A preparatory office and a preparatory committee for university evaluation organ (tentative) are set up within NIAD, then-called Gakui Juyo Kiko in Japanese.
2000Reorganized NIAD, with its Japanese name changed to Daigaku-Hyoyka Gakui-Juyo Kiko in Japanese (English name unchanged), is launched. Evaluations under NIAD, to which all the national universities are subjected, marks Japan's first-ever uniform third-party evaluation system to assess the quality of university education.

This month's featured article

University Evaluations: What will Become of Japanese Universities?
<RIETI Featured Fellow> HARAYAMA Yuko

HARAYAMA YukoFaculty Fellow, RIETI

Event Information

For a complete list of past and upcoming event information.

Symposiums

Workshops

BBL Seminars

Fellow titles and links in the text are as of the date of publication.

For questions or comments regarding RIETI Report, please contact .

RIETI Report is published monthly.